Tag Archives: manuals

July 17 Webinar on Bunny Hops & Manuals

On Monday, July 17, I’m hosting two live webinars on Bunny Hops & Manuals in which you’ll learn:

  • What they are and are not
  • Why they’re helpful & fun on the trail
  • Why they’re hard to learn on your own
  • How you can learn them via Ryan Leech’s online courses and do it with me and a group of fellow students

Register here for the webinar at 12 PM CDT on Monday, July 17.

Register here for the webinar at 9PM CDT on Monday, July 17.

Top 5 reasons why it’s so hard to learn to bunny hop: Episode 4 of MTBSN podcast on Mountain Bike Radio

Episode #4 of my MTBSN podcast on Mountain Bike Radio is now available.

See the show notes and links on the MBR page for Episode #4.

Main topic: Top 5 reasons why it’s so hard to learn to bunny hop

TRANSCRIPT

Introduction:

Hey everyone! Welcome to Episode #4 of the Mountain Bike Skills Network podcast. My name is Griff Wigley, also known as the mountain bike geezer. I’m am the guy behind the Mountain Bike Skills Network blog and I’m the founder and host of the Mountain Bike Skills Network Community, currently a group on Facebook.

My intent is to have all three – the blog, the online community and this show — help recreational mountain bikers like you, have more fun while upping your skills. Why? So you can ride the stuff you want that challenges you. I think of it as a Goldilocks Zone. Not too scary or hard; not too easy or boring but juuuuuust right. That middle is where the fun is and one of the most reliable ways to stay in that Goldilocks Zone is to continually increase your skills.

You can learn more about the Mountain Bike Skills Network at mtbskills.net where you’ll also see links to my various social media accounts.

Today’s show is about the bunny hop, what some people refer to as the most difficult skill in mountain biking.

I learned to bunny hop recently and was surprised at how challenging it was just to get to the beginner level that I’m now at.

With help from members of the MTBSN community, I’ve put together what I think are the:

Top 5 reasons why it’s so hard to learn to bunny hop

 

Continue reading Top 5 reasons why it’s so hard to learn to bunny hop: Episode 4 of MTBSN podcast on Mountain Bike Radio

Video: achieving beginner-level bunny hop & manual skills

Video: doing a manual through a dip

After 5 weeks, I'm on Lesson 11 of 24 in @ryankleech's Manual Master Class which is all about "gaining comfort in a manual while rolling through a dip." I practiced the dip on some small rollers in our local @CROCTMTB skills park here in Northfield (my hometown) last Thursday and got to where I could consistently manual over one. It gave me enough confidence to try a bigger dip at @lebanonhills on Friday. It was psychologically much more intimidating because of the two trees just past the dip. I was reluctant to go fast enough and I wasn't confident that I could correct my direction if I started to lean to one side or the other. After about 10 attempts, all fails to one degree or another, I finally nailed one. Kind of scary but So Much Fun. Course info at mtbskills.net/ryan

A post shared by Mountain Bike Skills Network (@mountainbikeskillsnetwork) on

Progress on pump-manualing across two bumps: a very sweet feeling indeed

Mastering Mountain Bike SkillsIn the Pump Terrain for Free Speed chapter of Lee McCormack’s book Mastering Mountain Bike Skills, he has a one-pager titled Pump-manualing across two bumps.

He writes:

This is one of the coolest-looking, sweetest-feeling moves in mountain biking.

Continue reading Progress on pump-manualing across two bumps: a very sweet feeling indeed

Using a pedal wheelie to get over the bridge rock at Lebanon Hills

bridge rock at Lebanon Hills bridge rock at Lebanon Hills

This past summer, I blogged about my attempts to get up and over the bridge rock at Lebanon Hills, with a follow-up post on whether it and other big rocks at Lebanon Hills require a full bunny hop.

Ken Barker, family photoWhen I rode Leb with Iowa’s Ken Barker in August, I showed him how I used a manual wheelie to get over the bridge rock and he promptly showed me that he could get over it clean with a pedal wheelie.  I didn’t get a photo or video of it but it was burned into my brain, as I was curious whether I could do the same.

I did this week. It only took me 17 tries. Gah.

The problem for me was two-fold: 1) I mostly suck at doing pedaling wheelies  (see Ken doing two long ones in my video of him at Ray’s) so I had a hard time keeping the wheelie straight; and 2) I couldn’t get the timing right for pressing down into the pedals and springing upward so that the rear wheel would ‘levitate’ prior to hitting the rock.

In my 90-second video, I only included 8 of my 17 failed attempts. It includes a slo-mo and two stills of the one successful ride.

I wanted to finish it up with a video of a manual wheelie over the rock from a rear view angle (earlier videos were front view here and side view here). I put the camera on a tripod in the middle of the bridge which caused me to slow down slightly as I rode by it. The lack of speed and lack of front wheel height on the manual was almost disastrous, as I nearly did a header right into the rock. Have a laugh: