Tag Archives: Chance Glasford

Photo album: Cottage Grove Bike Park’s 2nd Annual Party at the Park

Last week’s 2nd Annual Party at the Park fundraiser at the Cottage Grove Bike Park was a hit. I was pleased to be there as a MORC board member and it was a hoot to be riding the two pump tracks with so many others. Props to Dirt Boss/Trail Steward Chance Glasford, Kelly Glasford, and all the other volunteers who worked so hard on the event.

See the large slideshow of 71 photos or SLOW CLICK this small slideshow:

Photo album: Cottage Grove Bike Park grand opening

Last night’s grand opening of MORC‘s Cottage Grove Bike Park was a big hit.  Props to Trail Steward Chance Glasford and his crew of Dirt Bosses for building an amazing facility, and to the City of Cottage Grove for its involvement.

Pump track, Cottage Grove Bike Park 4x track, Cottage Grove Bike Park

The bike park currently has a 4X race track and two pump tracks. Phases 2 and 3 will include a tot track, slopestyle course, mountain bike skills course and dirt jumps.  Construction for some of those additions will begin soon, as the bike park won the 2014 Bell Built contest, Midwest regionContinue reading Photo album: Cottage Grove Bike Park grand opening

Let’s win $33,000 for the Cottage Grove Bike Park

Chance Glasford Cottage Grove Bike Park

I blogged twice last year about the development of the Cottage Grove Bike Park.  I’ve been following it closely since A) it’s relatively close to my house (45 minutes); B) it’s huge; and C) it’s been the passion of Chance Glasford, fellow MORC Board member and the guy who taught me how to pump.

2014BellBuilt_FinalistPoster_CentralFinalists 2014_BellBuilt_Facebook_WallPost_CottageGrove

The park is a finalist in the Midwest region, competing for a third of the $100,000 grant offered by Bell Helmets in conjunction with IMBA. The winner is determined by popular vote going on now through May 4.  Continue reading Let’s win $33,000 for the Cottage Grove Bike Park

Photo album: MORC Board annual meeting

L to R standing: Andrey Ablamunets, Chance Glasford, Matt Moore, Jay Thompson, Susannah King, Brandon Charboneau, Kristin Clark, Reed Smidt, Matt Andrews, Todd Reiman, Corey Kronser; kneeling: Porter Million, Griff Wigley; not pictured: Mark GavinIt’s old news now but while reviewing my blog posts since the beginning of the year, I see that I’ve neglected to specifically mention that I became a member of the MORC Board in January. We held an all-day annual meeting (retreat!) on January 5 and I moderated a webinar on what happened at it a week laterContinue reading Photo album: MORC Board annual meeting

Young guys sweep MORC’s 2013 annual awards: Chance, Adam, Colin, Mike

Adam Buck, Chance Glasford, Colin VanDerHydeThe MORC Board announced its annual awards last month and four young guys (three in the right photo) were recognized for their volunteer work:  Chance Glasford for the President’s Award; Adam Buck for Volunteer of the Year; and Colin VanDerHyde and Mike Mullany for Trail Workers of the Year.

As a geezer, I’m glad to see this.

Continue reading Young guys sweep MORC’s 2013 annual awards: Chance, Adam, Colin, Mike

The height of a skinny: managing the danger is part of the fun

Leb skinny intermediate outIn a MORC forum discussion thread this week, I commented to Lebanon Hills Dirt Boss Dave Tait about the height of the big log skinny in the intermediate out section of Leb. He had told me that when the tree originally fell, they had to lower it a bit to comply with Dakota County’s height limit of 30 inches. I used the phrase "dumbed down."

Battle Creek Dirt Boss Tom Gehring wrote:

This touched a bit of a sore point with me. I may be in the minority, but I fail to see how "lowering it" is dumbing it down. It still takes just as much skill to ride without dabing it just reduces the consequences of a fall.

Dave Tait wrote:

I agree. There was never an issue of feeling like we were dumbing down that tree ride. We peeled the bark off, prepared the ride surface to a minimum and then measured up the height. It was a little high so we put a saddle beneath it and dropped the height to our allowed limit. The end result is actually tougher than the original with bark because you slip off easier. The only resistance to lowering it was that we needed to figure out a few details and do a little extra work.

Chance Glasford, chief designer of the Eagan and Cottage Grove bike parks, wrote:

I see no issue with keeping skinnies low, the skill is in the balancing act…

A big part of any sport is managing performance anxiety. That can be danger-related or it can be stage-related.

Learning the balance beam in gymnastics can start with a harness and the beam on the ground. And then it’s doing it without the harness. And then with the beam higher. And then in front of parents or at a competition.

We all know the experience of choking, knowing that we can perform a skill when it’s practice but screw it up when it’s performance time.

I see skinnies this way. The variety of skinnies in Leb’s skills park is perfect, IMHO: some are smooth, straight and low. Others are crooked and bumpy and a bit higher off the ground. Likewise,  the skinnies at Ray’s Indoor Bike Park. Both parks offer lots of progression options.

Carver raised bridge skinnyOut on the trails in the Twin Cities area, there are man-made skinnies with some height if you want to try them: some wide but higher up; others narrower and higher up. They freak some people out and others love the challenge and see them as a way to try to put those skills learned in the skills park into use on the trail "For Real." The man-made skinny at Carver Lake Park is a great example of a high skinny with options: variable widths and an exit before the most difficult narrow part.

61 skinny Murphy-HanrehanLikewise, the man-made ’61 skinny’ at Murphy-Hanrehan: wide, then very narrow, back to wide, then a dirt ramp out-option before it starts curving and gets higher.

Most intermediate riders could clean it if it was flat on the ground but its height adds the element of danger. The athletic challenge is managing one’s anxiety.

As you can see in this 30-second video, I can easily clean it but if I made a $10,000 bet on it and had to do it in front of a crowd, I’d probably choke.

Stockade skinny HillsideThe stockade skinny at Hillside (the ‘Browner’, named after the first—and thus far, only person to have cleaned, Ray Brown; video here) is the most challenging skinny in the metro area and possibly the entire state.  It’s all or nothing. As designer/dirt boss Rich Omdahl wrote:

The Browner is in its own class of evil. I’ve never even made it half way across it. I designed that thing to have 8 layers of difficulty. The first one you contend with is that I built it at the top of a climb on an uphill slope with an off camber entry. Then it gets harder.

Most local expert riders could probably clean the Browner if was a foot off the ground but the danger of not making it at its current height is a big psychological barrier for most of us. Danny MacAskill and Ryan Leech would be bored with it, but they have their psychological barriers, too.

Somewhat related: A friend of mine remarked recently that he thought the arguments to legalize exploding fireworks (eg, firecrackers, cherry bombs, etc) were off-base. "Why not just enjoy the explosions that are set off by the professionals?" he asked. I said to him: "Because a big part of the fun is in managing the danger."

See all my blog posts tagged with the word ‘skinnies.’